Technology – A Force Multiplier For Societal Development

Publised on: 27-02-2020

technology blog

Technological innovation and Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) represent a way for developing world nations to foster economic development, improve levels of education and training, as well as address gender issues within society.
And while the above represents what most of us experience in our lives, there exists a population of almost 736 million people which live on less than $1.90 a day (as per a World Bank report of 2015). This segment lives in extreme poverty caused by dearth of access to good schools, health care, electricity, safe water, and limitations of other critical services. Statistically, the figure seems to be declining with time, however, there is uneven growth and disparities of income which remain to be addressed.

One of the key roles technology plays is to bridge real time gaps between demand and supply sides. Not just does it bring with it a lot of convenience but also transparency and governance in many organizations and at the Government level. Technological innovation and Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) represent a way for developing world nations to foster economic development, improve levels of education and training, as well as address gender issues within society.
Here are some of the instances where technology could bring in a major transition in socio economic development-

We can see how technology can play a key role in making available a resource which was once scarce. Countries like Japan which have come up with innovative solutions to make life simpler- their military technology, renewable energy innovation, discovery of x-ray are a few examples. US today has one of the finest intelligence systems owing to the advance technological equipment, South Korea’s LG & Samsung have leading examples of in production of air conditioners, robots, televisions, computers, trains, airplanes, helicopters, cars. Sanskrit was considered as the most useful language for the computer system and most of the new software technology comes from India. Israel’s breakthrough innovation in agriculture has turned deserts into green pastures.
While these are all the brighter side of the fence, technology today is both an enabler and a threat to environmental damage. While future prosperity is sure to be driven through advances in robotics, 3D printing, artificial intelligence, and the internet of things, some of them could also pose new challenges for the work force. Emphasis on responsible usage and focus on generating new occupations and industries leveraging technology could be the next innovation opportunity waiting to unfold itself.